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Three Things You Need to Know About Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Nov 28, 2013 @ 18:11 PM

 



 

Gettysburg dentist

As with most things, periodontal disease starts small, unnoticeable. First, unattended bacteria deposit a colorless, sticky layer on your teeth, which eventually becomes plaque. Uncontrolled plaque damages gums and bone and give rise to periodontal disease. That’s the development of periodontal disease in a nutshell but there’s more to the story. More and more scientific studies are pointing to a scarier picture than at first glance. Periodontal disease is now linked to a number of systematic diseases, among them, diabetes. The periodontal disease and diabetes correlation has serious health implications.

There are ongoing debates as to whether periodontal disease compounds diabetes or whether diabetes compounds periodontal disease. Both possibilities are viable. Here are three things you need to know about periodontal disease and diabetes:

Diabetes Affects Periodontal Disease


Diabetes increases glucose presence in the saliva and that makes a conducive environment for bacteria. They have a field day and manufacture more plaque to ruin gums and teeth. That’s one scenario. In another scenario, diabetic patients tend to have high levels of inflammatory chemicals known as interleukins, that can cause damage to blood vessels. Decreased blood flow to the gums may worsen periodontal disease.

Periodontal Disease Affects Diabetes

If you have periodontal disease, it may be more difficult tocontrol diabetes. Why? Severe cases of periodontal disease increase blood sugar. That does not sit well for a diabetic person as sustained high blood glucose level can lead to diabetic complications such as damaged nerves (which further jeopardize gum health), poor eye health and hypertension.

Treat One, Treat Another

As you can see, periodontal disease and diabetes are closely linked together. One affects the other. Periodontal disease makes it hard to control blood sugar and diabetes increase risks of periodontal disease. What is one supposed to do, given the close link? Break the cycle. Studies reveal that treating periodontal disease will help you control blood glucose. Conversely, living healthy and managing diabetes will lessen your appeal as a periodontal disease candidate.

Oral hygiene is key in this vicious link. Keep periodontal disease in check with regular checkups and routine cleaning. Visit your Gettysburg dentist for a comprehensive dental exam to determine if you have periodontal disease or initial gum disease (gingivitis). Our knowledgeable and caring team at our Gettysburg dental office will be happy to help you in any possible way.

 

Submitted by:  Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: gettysburg sleep dentist, Gum Disease, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg Dentist talks about fun dental history facts!

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Nov 21, 2013 @ 14:11 PM

Gettysburg dentist

The history of dentistry has been an
interesting one. Did you know there is recorded evidence that people were
concerned with the appearance and health of their teeth dating back over 4,000
years ago? And toothbrushes existed before 600AD? Exploring the intriguing
history surrounding the dental arts can be entertaining, fun, and
mysterious.

  • Evidence suggests braces were used to correct teeth in ancient times. They first appeared in recorded history around 2022BC. Around 400-300 BC scholars like Aristotle and Socrates discussed and contemplated the best way to correct one's crooked teeth.

 

  • Think implants are part of modern dental technology? Think again, the Mayans were using endosseous implants in 600AD. The evidence supporting the Mayan's use of implants was unearthed by Archaeologists in Honduras in 1939.

 

  • The first dental book ever published was called The Operator for
    Teeth
    . It was written by Charles Allen in 1685. There are only two known copies still intact, one resides in the library of the College of Dentistry at New York University, the other is in York Minister.

 

  • John Greenwood was the first native born dentist. It was he who designed George Washington's dentures. He made the dentures using Hippopotamus tusks. The bill Greenwood sent to Washington for payment is dated 1799.

 

  • Dr. Horace Wells was the first dentist to use nitrous oxide as an
    anesthetic. The first demonstration performed using nitrous was on December 11, 1844. 

 

  • Over the centuries, dentists have used many different items to fill teeth.
    These have included: stone chips, turpentine resin, gum, metals, cork, lead, and gold foil. Dental cement made of baked porcelain was developed by B. Wood in 1862.

 

  • Miss Lucy Hobbs was the first woman to ever graduate dental school in 1864. Having her diploma she opened her office in Iowa, from there she opened another office in Chicago. Her dental career was considered extremely successful.

If you are considering dental work or are due for a check up, contact the experts at Samuels
Dental Arts, P.C. Their family owned and operated practice offers sedation dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, implants, dentures, and family dentistry.

Article submitted by Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: Dental history, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg dentist discusses history of toothbrush

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Nov 14, 2013 @ 14:11 PM

Gettysburg dentist

 

No one invention in dental history is more appreciated
than the toothbrush. Natural bristle brushes were first introduced by the
ancient Chinese. These early dental inventors first devised the toothbrush using
natural bristles attached to the bones of cold climate pigs. 

French dentists were the first to introduce toothbrushes to European culture
in the seventeenth and early eighteenth century. William Addis of England was
the first individual in history to promote the toothbrush commercially in
Europe, prompting many individuals to rethink their personal dental care. 

After the Civil War, American H.N. Wadsworth began to manufacture and sell
the first mass produced toothbrush. The earliest commercial-style brush was
produced in Massachusetts by the Florence Manufacturing Company. The brush was
called the Pro-phy-lac-tic. Try saying that ten times fast.

Nylon bristle toothbrushes became popular around 1938. The first nylon style
brush was produced by the DuPont Company. According to statistics, the act of
brushing one's teeth did not gain in popularity until WWII, when soldiers got in
the habit of brushing during boot camp.

The first electric toothbrush ever made was designed and developed in
Switzerland in 1939. The Squibb company perfected the electric toothbrush in
1960 and began distribution in America (to dentist offices only) around the same
time, it was called the Broxodent. Electric cordless toothbrushes were not
available to the public in America until 1987 from a company called
Interplak.

Toothpaste has been proven to be in existence as early as 500BC. The earliest
users of toothpaste were the ancient inhabitants of China and India. Modern
style toothpaste was developed in the early 1800s. An American by the name of
John Harris was the first to ever add chalk as an ingredient of toothpaste. Dr.
Washington Sheffield of Connecticut was the first person to introduce toothpaste
in a tube. Colgate adapted Sheffield's design and later added detergents and
flouride to the mix for better tooth maintenance.

Dental history facts are fun, but if you are looking for a modern, hi tech, Gettysburg dentist, look to the future at Samuels Dental Arts P.C.!

 

Article submitted by:  Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: Dental history, Gettysburg dentist

Considering a Sedation Dentist?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Sun, Nov 10, 2013 @ 15:11 PM

 



Sedation dentist in Gettysburg

 

If you are like many Americans, just the word "dentist" can send shivers down your spine. New innovation and technology has made dentistry less invasive and easier to handle than ever before. Choosing a sedation dentist can help you face your fears and finally have that dental work you have been putting off for so long.

Sedation dentistry is no longer reserved for surgeries or complicated procedures. Sedation dentists offer sedation anesthesia for cleanings, fillings, implants, crowns and almost any dental procedure. When deciding which sedation dentist will be best for you, it is important to evaluate the experience and training of the dentist.  Our office uses the services of a medical anesthesiologist.  The level of sedation he can provide is much greater than with just a pill taken before the appointment  

You may be wondering if you can afford sedation dentistry. To be truthful, the cost varies per procedure, per patient. But one of the most attractive benefits of sedation dentistry is that more work can be done in less time. This means more than one procedure can be performed during a single visit. Fewer trips to the dentist can save you money in the long run.  Often years of work can be caught up in one, comfortable visit.  Many patients feel like they were in the chair for just five minutes!  

Anxiety about going to the dentist does not have to be the norm. Choosing the right dentist can work wonders for your appearance and health. When deciding which sedation dentist is right for you, narrow your search by stopping by the dentists office or contacting them via the internet. In most cases, the dentist's staff will be happy to explain their sedation procedures, services they offer, and potential cost.

For more information on sedation dentistry and how it can benefit you, contact us at Samuel's Dental Arts, P.C. Our family run and operated dental office has proudly serves
the residents of Gettysburg, PA and the surrounding areas using cutting-edge technology coupled with the most gentle approach. 


Topics: Sedation dentist Gettysburg, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

Gettysburg Dentist discusses the Benefits of Cerec Porcelain Onlays

Posted by Peter Samuels on Tue, Nov 5, 2013 @ 14:11 PM

Gettysburg Cerec Dentist

 

There are several techniques and  materials that a Gettysburg dentist may use to
restore teeth. Composite resin is usefull if the cavity isn't too big.  Crowns made of porcelain, metal, or a combination can hold a tooth together when the cavity is very large.  Porcelain onlays made by a Cerec machine, are somewhere in between. Here’s a closer look
at what Cerec onlays are and why this Gettysburg dentist likes to use them.

Although similar, a porcelain Cerec onlay is not a crown. Onlays are designed to
restore a tooth’s biting surface. They are often used by Cerec trained dentists
when a patient’s tooth has a cavity that is too large for a standard filling. A
crown, on the other hand, is designed to cover more surface area. Therefore, it
is often used when an entire tooth has sustained extensive damage.

There are several advantages that may be gained by utilizing porcelain onlays
over other restorative materials. To begin with, Cerec onlays allow for the preservation of
the natural tooth. They also tend to blend in nicely with a person’s existing
teeth. As a matter of fact, Cerec restorations are virtually invisible.

 

Cerec onlays generally take one visit to fabricate.  The tooth is numbed.  The decay is removed and an infrared image of the prepared tooth is uploaded to a computer.  No messy impressions necessary!  The Cerec restoration is designed on the computer and milled by a cad cam robot type machine.  It is then chemically bonded to the tooth.  Unlike with a lab made crown, there is no need for the patient to return for a second visit.

To learn more about porcelain Cerec onlays and speak with a Gettysburg
dentist
, please contact Samuels Dental Arts P.C. Our Gettysburg dentists may be
reached online or by calling (717) 778-4268. We also serve patients in
Chambersburg, Hanover and Harrisburg.

Topics: Gettysburg Cerec Dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg

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