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Here are a few more Interesting Tidbits about Dental History!

Posted by Peter Samuels on Fri, Dec 27, 2013 @ 11:12 AM

 

Gettysburg Dentist history facts

 

There is evidence of dentistry being practiced as far back as 7000 BC; at that time, bow drills were used in the treatment of tooth decay. In ancient Greece tooth extraction was a common procedure used to treat a variety of different illnesses, and the professionals who treated dental problems were not doctors but barbers. It wasn’t until the years between 1650 and 1800 when modern dentistry got its start.

The history of dentistry is filled with odd and sometimes humorous happenings. Here are some of the most interesting facts about dentistry:

Contrary to popular belief, President George Washington’s false teeth were not constructed of wood; his teeth were actually made from a combination of elephant tusks, human, cow and walrus teeth and gold.

Experts recommend that you store your toothbrush at least six feet away from your toilet. Why? When you flush, fecal particles travel through the air and can land on a tooth brush up to six feet away. Using a toothbrush cap is not the best solution to this problem: the moist environment maintained by a toothbrush cover allows more bacteria to grow and multiply.

A snail’s mouth is the size of the head of a pin and contains about 25,000 teeth.

Tooth decay is the second most prevalent illness in the United States behind the common cold.

Each person’s teeth are as unique as their fingerprints; even identical twins have a different dental “fingerprint”. Paul Revere is the first person known to have used dental forensics to identify a body.

In 2012, the average amount left by the tooth fairy was $2 per tooth.

The average man in the United States smiles 8 times a day; the average woman smiles 62 times per day.

Giraffes only have bottom teeth. 

These are just a few of the many interesting facts about dentistry. Here’s one final fact that produced several humorous headlines in 1994: A prisoner in Charleston, West Virginia escaped by braiding dental floss into a rope about the thickness of a telephone cord. He then used the rope to scale an 18 foot wall in the recreation yard and made his escape.

 

Submitted by Peter Samuels, DDS

Topics: Dental history, Cosmetic Dentistry, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

Gettysburg Dentist discusses Periodontal Disease

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Dec 19, 2013 @ 14:12 PM

Gettysburg dentist gum disease

 


 

Periodontal disease affects gum tissue and bone supporting the teeth, resulting in red and swollen gums, bad breath, receding gums and loose teeth. Left untreated, it is the major cause of tooth loss. An increasing body of studies reveal that periodontal disease may be linked to a number of major diseases including heart disease, diabetes, stroke, osteoporosis and cancer. Considering that one out of two American adults, aged 30 and over, suffer from some form of periodontal disease, understanding how periodontal disease is related to other health risks  is crucial.

Diabetes

According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, diabetes increases the risk of periodontal disease. Impaired blood flow that comes with diabetes may weaken gums and bone and make them more susceptible to infection. In addition, higher glucose levels in the mouth fluids make it ideal for bacteria to flourish, further encouraging gum disease. The reverse may be true as well. Research has also shown that periodontal disease may also complicate diabetes, making it difficult for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar.

Heart Disease

Evidence suggests that people with periodontal disease are twice as likely to have heart disease. While the cause and effect is still unclear, scientists believe that inflammation may be blamed for the strong correlation. Bacteria from the mouth may enter the blood stream and deposit in the arteries, thereby blocking blood flow. Another possibility is that the bacteria may trigger the body’s natural defense mechanism to kick in, resulting in inflammation and blocking of blood arteries.

Osteoporosis

Bone loss associated with osteoporosis is often blamed for diminished stature or hip fracture but it is also linked to bone loss in the jaw. The National Institutes of Health revealed a greater propensity to lose jaw bone if you have osteoporosis.

Respiratory Disease

Bacteria in the oral cavity may be aspirated into the lungs and cause complications such as pneumonia and pulmonary embolism.

Cancer

Yes, it’s linked to the dreaded disease as well. Men with advanced periodontal disease have a 63% higher incidence of pancreatic cancer. Even moderate periodontal disease may increase lung, kidney and blood cancer by 14%.

If periodontal disease is linked to major systemic diseases, it’s paramount to maintain good oral health. Visit your dentist regularly for periodic checkup and routine cleaning. Keeping periodontal disease at arm’s length will greatly improve your overall health.

 

Topics: dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg, Periodontal Disease, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

Where did the Tooth Fairy Come From?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Dec 12, 2013 @ 16:12 PM

Gettysburg dentist tooth fairy

 


 

As kids, most of us received money from the tooth fairy whenever we lost a tooth. Few of us, however, know about the history of the tooth fairy tradition.

The tradition of the tooth fairy began centuries ago in Europe. A child’s first lost tooth was buried in the ground to keep witches from stealing the tooth and using it to cast spells on the child; burying the tooth also ensured the growth of a new tooth in its place.

Children have twenty “baby teeth” and start to lose them around age five or six—around the time they begin going to school. In most cultures this is considered a rite of passage, a sign that the child is growing up. The loss of teeth can be scary and painful for kids, and the tooth fairy helps to soften the blow.

The tooth fairy we now know in the United States emerged in the early 1900s, when the lost baby tooth was placed under a child’s pillow and in its place money appeared. Initially the tooth fairy appeared only after the loss of the first tooth, but as the tradition became more popular the tooth fairy visited a child each time a tooth was lost, until the child stopped believing—after age seven for most children.

The first children’s story written about the tooth fairy—“The Tooth Fairy”, by Lee Rogow, was published in 1949 and the tradition really caught on. By the 1950s, the concept of the tooth fairy began to grow, and more books, cartoons and jokes about the tooth fairy appeared.

In the 1980s the tooth fairy enjoyed a resurgence; during that decade several tooth fairy commercial products became available. One of the most popular was a tooth fairy pillow, with a pocket sewn on the outside to store the tooth and receive the money.

Rosemary Wells, known as the world's leading tooth fairy authority, studied the price paid for teeth from 1900 to 1980 and compared it to the consumer price index. She found that the tooth fairy kept up with inflation. In 2013, the reward left varies by country and the family's economic status, among other factors, but a 2013 survey by Visa Inc. found that American children receive $3.70 per tooth on average.

Submitted by Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: History of Dentistry, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

Fun Facts about Dental History from Peter Samuels, DDS

Posted by Peter Samuels on Sun, Dec 8, 2013 @ 18:12 PM

dental history

 


 

It's time to dive deep ladies and gents, the History of Dentistry is more interesting than you may think. Though many of us may be apprehensive about our dental checkups, dentistry is one of the oldest forms of formal medical care in human history. Take a look at the bellow fun facts and spread the word, dentistry's colorful and intriguing past will help you greatly appreciate the current practices and technology used today.

  • St Appollonia was one of the first virgin martyrs to suffer during the great uprising in Alexandria. According to legend, St. Appollonia's punishment for her beliefs was to have all of her teeth pulled and shattered. That is why today she is considered the patron saint of dentistry and those suffering from dental pain or apprehension.
  • Think your toothbrush is a modern marvel, Archaeologists say no way. Evidence states the first toothbrush was developed in China during he Tang Dynasty (619-907AD). European travelers brought these curious inventions back with them from their travels to Asia, introducing them to Europe and eventually the entire western world.
  • August Tavieau invented the first dental amalgam in 1816. He developed the amalgam using silver coins and mercury but mysteriously never used them until 10 years later. Eventually the FDA began to regulate the amalgam and it is now considered a medical device under the law.
  • Dental records were first used to identify victims of mass disaster in 1878 after the Vienna Opera House fire. In 1897, they were again used for identification of the 126 poor souls who perished in the infamous fire of Paris, France. This prompted Oscar Amoedo to write the first textbook of forensic dentistry. Since its publication, it has become the foundation for dentistry in forensic science, and has helped criminal investigators solve cases all over the world.

For more information about any aspect ofdentistry, be sure to ask the staff at Samuels Dental Arts P.C. They emphasize anxiety-free, sedation dentistry. Their caring and knowledgeable staff can help you overcome your fear of the dentist and get your oral health back on track.

Submitted by Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: History of Dentistry, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg dentist

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