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Do You Know How to Take Care of Your Dentures?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Jan 30, 2014 @ 16:01 PM

Gettysburg Dentures

 


 

You’ve finally had your dentures made. Whether you need them to fill up missing teeth or to replace all your teeth, dentures give you a boost of self-esteem by completing your smile and enabling you to eat properly. You want them to last, to look good for a long time and stay clean and healthy. Here are some effective tips to keep your dentures in better shape than ever. 

Handle With Care 

Although dentures are made with hardy materials such as acrylic resin or durable plastic, they still need tender loving care. Rough handling may chip, break or scratch the polished surface. When handling dentures, stand over a towel or a sink full of water.

Daily Care

Treat dentures like natural teeth. Brush faithfully, at least twice a day to prevent build up of food particles and plaque. Dentists advise using a toothbrush with soft bristles to prevent abrasive effect on dentures. It’s a good habit to remember to rinse dentures in between meals.  One of the very best denture cleaners is antibacterial hand soap!

Denture Cleaner

Even with careful brushing, sometimes, stain, bacteria and plaque may still build up in between teeth. To remove these undesirable elements, a number of denture cleaner (or cleanser) is available. It ranges from chemical formulas in the form of cream, liquid, powder or tablet to mechanical cleaners such as denture brushes or ultrasonic denture cleaner that uses sound waves to dislodge deposits. If in doubt as to what cleaner to use, look for one with the American Dental Association (ADA) seal of acceptance. Your dentist will be the best person to advise you on what to use to effectively clean your denture.

When Not in Use

You see it on television, how dentures are placed in a glass of water by the night stand when not in use. As antiquated (perhaps the black and white movie is to be blamed) as that seems, that’s the idea. Dentures should be kept moist when not in use. They should be soaked in a denture cleaning solution or water.

With proper care, your denture will stay in optimal shape and condition and will serve you well. Proper care will also maintain oral hygiene and reduce denture odor.

If you’ve further questions about taking care of dentures, feel free to contact us. We’ll be glad to help you with your dental needs.

 

Topics: dentures in Gettysburg, Gettysburg Dentures, dentures Gettysburg, Dentist in Gettysburg, Dentist Gettysburg

Gum Disease May Increase Certain Health Risks

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Jan 23, 2014 @ 14:01 PM

Gettysburg dentist gum disease


 

Gum disease is the result of unchecked bacterial activities in the mouth causing inflammation of the gums and tissues that surround and support the teeth resulting in eventual tooth loss. But its devastating effects are not just confined to the mouth. Various studies reveal a frightening correlation: a number of health risks may be related to gum disease such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease and certain cancers. 

Endocarditis

The bacteria in the mouth don’t just stay in the mouth cavity. Bacteria may enter the blood stream via the infected gum and attached themselves to the damaged areas of the heart. When that happens, the inner lining of the heart becomes infected resulting in endocarditis. If it's left untreated, it may cause damage or destroy the heart value. 

Cardiovascular Disease

Those suffering from gum disease are twice as likely to have cardiovascular disease because bacteria in the mouth may cause the hardening of arteries. There are two possibilities. In the first possibility,  the bacteria traveling through the blood stream may stick to the fatty plaques already in the blood stream, bulking it up and narrowing the arteries in the process. The other possibility, and the more current of the two, has to do with the body’s response to invading bacteria in the blood stream. It triggers inflammation, thereby causing the blood cells to swell and narrow the arteries.

Diabetes

Does gum disease compound diabetes or does diabetes contribute to gum disease? The chicken-and-egg question remains open to debate but one thing is clear: research shows that gum disease and diabetes are closely linked. Those with gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar level, which may lead to more diabetes complications. Conversely, diabetes makes the body more susceptible to infection, gum included.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis, the disease that leads to bone loss, may also affect the bone in the jaw. When the density of the bone in the jaw decreases, it becomes unstable and loses its ability to support the teeth.

Respiratory Disease

People with gum disease are also more susceptible to respiratory disease as bacteria in the oral cavity may be aspirated into the lungs to cause respiratory complications and chronic lung conditions such as emphysema.

Other Diseases

Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, Sjogren's syndrome (an immune disorder), complications in people suffering from HIV/AIDS, even premature birth and low birth weight have been linked to gum disease.

If gum disease increases certain health risks, it is paramount to maintain good oral health by exercising oral hygiene and having regular dental checkups. Call us today for a comprehensive exam. 

Topics: Sedation dentist Gettysburg, Dentist in Gettysburg, Periodontal Disease, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

What You Should Know About Periodontal Disease Before It's Too Late

Posted by Peter Samuels on Mon, Jan 20, 2014 @ 11:01 AM

gum disease Gettysburg

 

Periodontal disease affects the gum and compromises the bone supporting the teeth. In full-blown cases, this silent but insidious disease may lead to eventual tooth loss. One out of two Americans, aged 30 and older, suffer from some form of periodontal disease, according to the Center for Disease Control. Given the preponderance of periodontal cases, how can you prevent periodontal disease? If knowledge is power, knowing how periodontal disease comes about and how you can prevent it is key to keeping it at bay. Let’s find out:

How It All Started

Just like a few little termites can eventually bring down the house by reproducing more termites to eat at the foundation of the house, periodontal disease begins small too. First, poor oral hygiene may give it fuel. Bacteria (together with food particles) in the mouth deposit a clear, slimy layer on the teeth, called plaque. If it’s not removed by tooth brushing or flossing, they hardened and form tartar (not the cream of tartar, but nasty gum-ruining tartar). Tartar can be stubborn and can only be removed with the help of professional cleaning.

Progression to Gingivitis

If plaque is left to fester, it wrecks damage. The bacteria inherent in plaque may cause gum inflammation, causing the gum to become red, swollen and to bleed easily. The dentist refers to this mild form of periodontal disease as gingivitis. It’s the beginning of the slide, unless you seek dental treatment right away.

Periodontal Disease

Unless gingivitis is taken care of, the plaque will continue its sure and sly work, causing the gum to pull away from the teeth, leaving “pockets” between the gum and the teeth, opening it up to infection. As the body tries to fight off these bacterial invasion of the gums, bacteria toxins formed and they break down the bone and connective tissue in the process. If it’s left unchecked, they will gradually destroy the bones, gums and tissue that support the teeth. The sad result? Loss of teeth.

How can you make sure you’re not a victim of periodontal disease?

Watch out for these telltale signs: perpetual bad breath, red, swollen gums that bleed easily, receding gums, longer-looking teeth, loose or sensitive teeth. If you’ve any of these symptoms, a visit to the dentist is necessary, even crucial.

Because periodontal disease can inflict serious damage in the long run, nipping it in the bud is your best bet. Call us today for a comprehensive dental exam.

Peter J. Samuels, DDS is a an instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School and a local Gettysburg dentist.  GettysburgFamilyDentist.com  334-0555

Submitted by Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: Sedation dentist Gettysburg, Dentist in Gettysburg, Periodontal Disease, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

George Washington and His Denture Woes

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Jan 9, 2014 @ 16:01 PM

 

Dentures of George Washington

 


 

Poor George Washington had bad teeth. They were often blamed for the shortest speech ever given by a President—just 135 words and a mere 90 seconds to deliver it. The outstanding commander of the Continental Army and the first president of the United States was often perceived as boring, stiff-jawed and bad tempered. There may be a reason for this persona as some interesting facts about dentistry reveal. 

Should we blame his poor image on his teeth? Perhaps, if you study the dentures he had to endure. His dentures consisted of crude fabrication of teeth that came with springs and bolts to hold these dentures in the mouth. Imagine trying to deliver a speech with the dentures rattling and air escaping through the gaps between the teeth.

History tells us that George Washington’s troubles with his teeth started when he was twenty-two. Over the course of the next thirty-five years, his teeth started falling off, one by one. And no, it was not because of his poor oral hygiene. According to records, he took heavy doses of mercurous chloride for his many infections (he was reputedly beset with all kinds of ailments from dysentery to smallpox), which in turn may have led to the destruction of his teeth. His fastidious brushing, use of dentifrice and mouthwash didn’t help much. By the time, he had his inauguration in 1789, he had one good tooth left.

For most of his adult life, he grappled with dental problems. Constant toothaches, infected gums and abscessed teeth, which we now know are symptoms of periodontal disease, plagued him. Initially, he had partial dentures with hippopotamus ivory carved to fit the upper gum and eight human teeth held by gold pivots for his lower plate. Spiral springs were used to secure them to his mouth. He had quite a few dentures made and he often returned them for adjustments and repairs. Clumsy and ill-fitting, they were forcing his lips out and his portraits revealed unfortunate facial changes. The final set of denture, made just before his death had a swagged gold plate, fastened by rivets.

Contrary to popular beliefs, none of dentures were made of wood. His four known sets of dentures include gold, ivory, lead, human and animal teeth (horse and donkey components likely).

Looking at George Washington’s ordeal with his oral health, thankfully, dentures have come a long way. Modern-day dentures look like real and are designed to make eating, talking and smiling as natural as possible. Held in by dental implants, they can be almost as natural as real teeth. Had George Washington lived today, he probably would have smiled more often (and therefore, deemed more friendly) and his speech would definitely be longer than 90 seconds.

For more information about the most upd to date denture techniques. dentures held in by dental implants or any dental needs, contact us.  

Submitted by Peter Samuels, DDS

Topics: dentures in Gettysburg, Gettysburg Dentures, dentures, Gettysburg dentist

New Technology for the New Year at Samuels Dental Arts P.C.

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Jan 2, 2014 @ 14:01 PM

technology pic

 


 

Dr. Peter Samuels, Dr. Julie Berger and the staff of Samuels Dental Arts P.C. want to wish you a Happy New Year and hope to see you in 2014. We welcome new patients and our goal is to serve your entire family. Come and give us a visit and see how our investment in new technology in dentistry can help you.

Our Gettysburg dental practice has invested in training and equipment to provide you with the latest in the dentistry. We have more options in your dental care that includes a CAD/CAM which allows for faster delivery options. We know that your time is valuable, ask about our CEREC same day crowns.

 

Dr. Samuels, earned his D.D.S. from Georgetown University School of Dentistry and, as a local Gettysburg dentist, has been active in his continuing education. He has attended the following programs among many many others: 

  • The Misch Implant Institute at the University of Pittsburg
  • The Pankey Institute of Graduate Dentistry
  • NYU's Rosenthal Cosmetic Dentistry course

Besides his full time Gettysburg dentl practice, he is currently a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School.

He maintains active memberships in:

  • American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry
  • Academy of General Dentistry (Fellowship status)
  • American Dental Association
  • American Dental Society of Anesthesiology

See our facebook page for his aikijuzu martial arts technique!

Dr. Julie Berger, DDS, as a board certified Prosthodontist trained for three additional years after dental school. She then attended a 1 year, full time fellowship in periodontal prosthodontics and in dental implant placement. She is an expert in dentures, crowns & bridges, implants and esthetics. She received her training from the University of Maryland and is a clinical instructor there.

She maintains memberships in:

  • American Board of Prosthdontics
  • Fellow of the American College of Prosthodontists
  • American Dental Association
  • Academy of General Dentistry
  • Pennsylvania Dental Association
  • Gettysburg Hanover Dental Society

So what's the latest in dentistry you might ask? Well, for starters we can make crowns quicker. In some cases we can have them done in one visit. Our porcelain onlays are a popular choice over silver amalgm fillings.

For cosmetic needs we have all ceramic crowns, veneers, and in office, power Teeth whitening.  We offer sedation dentistry with a board certified anesthesiologist. You and your family are in great hands with Dr. Samuels and Dr. Berger.

All phases of dentistry are offered including:

  • Veneers
  • All Ceramic Crowns
  • Porcelain and Gold Crowns
  • Implants
  • Teeth Whitening
  • Full mouth reconstruction
  • Dentures
  • Cerec one day crowns 
  • Sedation dentistry
  • Invisalign 

Our new, modern office has been designed for your comfort. Come by and pay us a visit. We love to give tours and hope to see more of you! We are located at 1650 Biglerville Road, Gettysberg, Pennsylvania 17325 (717)778-4268.

See our website for additional information. 

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, Cerec dentist, Gettysburg dental implants, Gettysburg implant dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg dentist

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