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Should Cosmetic Dentistry be part of your Wedding Plans?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Wed, Feb 25, 2015 @ 11:02 AM

 

 Cosmetic Dentistry

You’ve gotten engaged over the last few weeks and now it’s time to think about the future. So you wonder, “Should cosmetic dentistry be a part of our wedding plans?”  It’s a decision that should be made carefully. The good news is a visit to a dentist who provides cosmetic treatments may help steer you in the right direction. Your dentist and hygienist can clean your teeth and check for oral health problems that may interfere with you saying your “I dos.”  A cosmetic oriented dentist can examine your teeth and smile with an eye towards creating a great smile for the wedding day and beyond.  

What are some options?  Maybe you just need a little whitening either in the office with a power whitening system, or with custom made, take home whitening trays. If you have old, stained fillings in front teeth, they can be replaced with newer, modern bonded materials that blend in with your natural teeth.  Uneven, dark teeth can be bonded with veneers to give almost anyone the smile of their dreams.  Want them straighter?  Consider Invisalign.  Need a little lip plumping?  Juviderm may the answer.

Your initial visit will usually involve a thorough dental exam of your teeth and gums as well as any necessary digital x-rays to see bone levels.  Photographs are taken and sometimes molds will be made to evaluate your bite.  If veneers are an option then a wax-up of you final smile is made so you can see the result before anything is done to your teeth.

We have so many great options today for improving your smile.  But don’t wait till the last minute!  Getting a nice result can take some planning and time.

Peter J. Samuels, DDS is a local Gettysburg dentist and a clinical instructor at at University of Maryland Dental School.

717-334-0555      GettysburgCosmeticDental.com

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, Gettysburg cosmetic dentist

Health Risks Related to Gum Disease

Posted by Peter Samuels on Tue, Feb 17, 2015 @ 09:02 AM

 

 

Gum Disease Dentist

 

Often times when we think of a healthy mouth, the first thing that springs to mind is a sparkling, white smile. What we might not consider, however, is the role our gums play in our oral health. Periodontal disease, more commonly known as gum disease, is linked to a host of other health concerns. In fact, increasingly more research shows that the inflammation and bacteria associated with gum disease is likely related to heart disease, stroke, and other serious health problems. In short, poor oral health can jeopardize your overall health. Below we will discuss some of the health risks relating to gum disease.

Gum Disease and Heart Disease

Although a cause and effect relationship has yet to be established, there's a growing body of evidence suggesting the two are linked. People who have gum disease are more likely to have heart problems, including heart attacks. The common denominator, experts believe, is inflammation. In 2009, the American Academy of Periodontology and The American Journal of Cardiology released a paper suggesting that cardiologists ask their patients about prior gum disease and that periodontists gather patients' family heart history.

Periodontal Disease and Dementia

It may seem like an odd association, but researchers have also found a link between gum disease and dementia. Individuals who suffer from gum disease may have an increased risk of dementia later in life. 

Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

Those who suffer from diabetes are more likely to have gum disease. Inflammation is probably at least partly to blame for the connection. Additionally, individuals with diabetes are more susceptible to infections in general, including periodontal disease.

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gum Disease

At first glance, it might seem strange to link an oral disease to a type of arthritis. However, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by painful joints-- and inflammation. In fact, chronic inflammation is a common denominator in both rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease. People with RA may be more likely to also suffer from gum disease than the general population.

 

Peter J. Samuels, DDS is a Gettysburg dentist and a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School.  He may be contacted at 717-334-0555. GettysburgFamilyDentist.com

Topics: Diabetes and dentistry, Gum Disease, Periodontal Disease

Got Gaps? Dental Implants may be the Solution.

Posted by Peter Samuels on Tue, Feb 3, 2015 @ 14:02 PM

Dental Implants Gettysburg 

We often hear about incredible advances in medicine such as artificial organs grown in a laboratory and the latest artificial knees or hips.  We don’t hear as much about the latest advances in dentistry, but they have been just as stunning.

 

The last thirty years in dentistry, for example, has seen a revolution in the development and availability of dental implants.  Once considered experimental and as a last resort treatment, implants have become the best standard of care for many situations. They can replace a single tooth or all your teeth.   Implant dentistry is changing lives every bit as much as artificial knees and hips.

 

When we lose a tooth we actually lose a lot more.  Often 40 percent of the jawbone is lost within the first year of tooth extraction.  The face can collapse and we age prematurely.  Until implants were available, there was nothing we could do about this dramatic loss of facial structure.  Replacing a tooth or teeth with implants not only replaces the teeth, but even more importantly it prevents the melting away of the jaw structure. 

 

Problems with your loose,  lower denture?  As few as two implants can hold a lower denture solidly in place.  You can eat healthy foods you had given up on and stop worrying about embarrassing denture slips.

 

Want to learn more about dental implants?  Come to a free seminar at our office on Thursday Feb. 12 at 5:30 P.M.  Just give us a call to RSVP! 717-334-0555

 

Peter J. Samuels, DDS is a local Gettysburg dentist and a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School.

Topics: Gettysburg implant dentist, implant dentist, dental implants Gettysburg

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