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Where did the Tooth Fairy Come From?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Dec 12, 2013 @ 16:12 PM

Gettysburg dentist tooth fairy

 


 

As kids, most of us received money from the tooth fairy whenever we lost a tooth. Few of us, however, know about the history of the tooth fairy tradition.

The tradition of the tooth fairy began centuries ago in Europe. A child’s first lost tooth was buried in the ground to keep witches from stealing the tooth and using it to cast spells on the child; burying the tooth also ensured the growth of a new tooth in its place.

Children have twenty “baby teeth” and start to lose them around age five or six—around the time they begin going to school. In most cultures this is considered a rite of passage, a sign that the child is growing up. The loss of teeth can be scary and painful for kids, and the tooth fairy helps to soften the blow.

The tooth fairy we now know in the United States emerged in the early 1900s, when the lost baby tooth was placed under a child’s pillow and in its place money appeared. Initially the tooth fairy appeared only after the loss of the first tooth, but as the tradition became more popular the tooth fairy visited a child each time a tooth was lost, until the child stopped believing—after age seven for most children.

The first children’s story written about the tooth fairy—“The Tooth Fairy”, by Lee Rogow, was published in 1949 and the tradition really caught on. By the 1950s, the concept of the tooth fairy began to grow, and more books, cartoons and jokes about the tooth fairy appeared.

In the 1980s the tooth fairy enjoyed a resurgence; during that decade several tooth fairy commercial products became available. One of the most popular was a tooth fairy pillow, with a pocket sewn on the outside to store the tooth and receive the money.

Rosemary Wells, known as the world's leading tooth fairy authority, studied the price paid for teeth from 1900 to 1980 and compared it to the consumer price index. She found that the tooth fairy kept up with inflation. In 2013, the reward left varies by country and the family's economic status, among other factors, but a 2013 survey by Visa Inc. found that American children receive $3.70 per tooth on average.

Submitted by Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg, History of Dentistry

Fun Facts about Dental History from Peter Samuels, DDS

Posted by Peter Samuels on Sun, Dec 8, 2013 @ 18:12 PM

dental history

 


 

It's time to dive deep ladies and gents, the History of Dentistry is more interesting than you may think. Though many of us may be apprehensive about our dental checkups, dentistry is one of the oldest forms of formal medical care in human history. Take a look at the bellow fun facts and spread the word, dentistry's colorful and intriguing past will help you greatly appreciate the current practices and technology used today.

  • St Appollonia was one of the first virgin martyrs to suffer during the great uprising in Alexandria. According to legend, St. Appollonia's punishment for her beliefs was to have all of her teeth pulled and shattered. That is why today she is considered the patron saint of dentistry and those suffering from dental pain or apprehension.
  • Think your toothbrush is a modern marvel, Archaeologists say no way. Evidence states the first toothbrush was developed in China during he Tang Dynasty (619-907AD). European travelers brought these curious inventions back with them from their travels to Asia, introducing them to Europe and eventually the entire western world.
  • August Tavieau invented the first dental amalgam in 1816. He developed the amalgam using silver coins and mercury but mysteriously never used them until 10 years later. Eventually the FDA began to regulate the amalgam and it is now considered a medical device under the law.
  • Dental records were first used to identify victims of mass disaster in 1878 after the Vienna Opera House fire. In 1897, they were again used for identification of the 126 poor souls who perished in the infamous fire of Paris, France. This prompted Oscar Amoedo to write the first textbook of forensic dentistry. Since its publication, it has become the foundation for dentistry in forensic science, and has helped criminal investigators solve cases all over the world.

For more information about any aspect ofdentistry, be sure to ask the staff at Samuels Dental Arts P.C. They emphasize anxiety-free, sedation dentistry. Their caring and knowledgeable staff can help you overcome your fear of the dentist and get your oral health back on track.

Submitted by Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: Gettysburg dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg, History of Dentistry

Three Things You Need to Know About Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Nov 28, 2013 @ 18:11 PM

 



 

Gettysburg dentist

As with most things, periodontal disease starts small, unnoticeable. First, unattended bacteria deposit a colorless, sticky layer on your teeth, which eventually becomes plaque. Uncontrolled plaque damages gums and bone and give rise to periodontal disease. That’s the development of periodontal disease in a nutshell but there’s more to the story. More and more scientific studies are pointing to a scarier picture than at first glance. Periodontal disease is now linked to a number of systematic diseases, among them, diabetes. The periodontal disease and diabetes correlation has serious health implications.

There are ongoing debates as to whether periodontal disease compounds diabetes or whether diabetes compounds periodontal disease. Both possibilities are viable. Here are three things you need to know about periodontal disease and diabetes:

Diabetes Affects Periodontal Disease


Diabetes increases glucose presence in the saliva and that makes a conducive environment for bacteria. They have a field day and manufacture more plaque to ruin gums and teeth. That’s one scenario. In another scenario, diabetic patients tend to have high levels of inflammatory chemicals known as interleukins, that can cause damage to blood vessels. Decreased blood flow to the gums may worsen periodontal disease.

Periodontal Disease Affects Diabetes

If you have periodontal disease, it may be more difficult tocontrol diabetes. Why? Severe cases of periodontal disease increase blood sugar. That does not sit well for a diabetic person as sustained high blood glucose level can lead to diabetic complications such as damaged nerves (which further jeopardize gum health), poor eye health and hypertension.

Treat One, Treat Another

As you can see, periodontal disease and diabetes are closely linked together. One affects the other. Periodontal disease makes it hard to control blood sugar and diabetes increase risks of periodontal disease. What is one supposed to do, given the close link? Break the cycle. Studies reveal that treating periodontal disease will help you control blood glucose. Conversely, living healthy and managing diabetes will lessen your appeal as a periodontal disease candidate.

Oral hygiene is key in this vicious link. Keep periodontal disease in check with regular checkups and routine cleaning. Visit your Gettysburg dentist for a comprehensive dental exam to determine if you have periodontal disease or initial gum disease (gingivitis). Our knowledgeable and caring team at our Gettysburg dental office will be happy to help you in any possible way.

 

Submitted by:  Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: Gum Disease, gettysburg sleep dentist, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg Dentist talks about fun dental history facts!

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Nov 21, 2013 @ 14:11 PM

Gettysburg dentist

The history of dentistry has been an
interesting one. Did you know there is recorded evidence that people were
concerned with the appearance and health of their teeth dating back over 4,000
years ago? And toothbrushes existed before 600AD? Exploring the intriguing
history surrounding the dental arts can be entertaining, fun, and
mysterious.

  • Evidence suggests braces were used to correct teeth in ancient times. They first appeared in recorded history around 2022BC. Around 400-300 BC scholars like Aristotle and Socrates discussed and contemplated the best way to correct one's crooked teeth.

 

  • Think implants are part of modern dental technology? Think again, the Mayans were using endosseous implants in 600AD. The evidence supporting the Mayan's use of implants was unearthed by Archaeologists in Honduras in 1939.

 

  • The first dental book ever published was called The Operator for
    Teeth
    . It was written by Charles Allen in 1685. There are only two known copies still intact, one resides in the library of the College of Dentistry at New York University, the other is in York Minister.

 

  • John Greenwood was the first native born dentist. It was he who designed George Washington's dentures. He made the dentures using Hippopotamus tusks. The bill Greenwood sent to Washington for payment is dated 1799.

 

  • Dr. Horace Wells was the first dentist to use nitrous oxide as an
    anesthetic. The first demonstration performed using nitrous was on December 11, 1844. 

 

  • Over the centuries, dentists have used many different items to fill teeth.
    These have included: stone chips, turpentine resin, gum, metals, cork, lead, and gold foil. Dental cement made of baked porcelain was developed by B. Wood in 1862.

 

  • Miss Lucy Hobbs was the first woman to ever graduate dental school in 1864. Having her diploma she opened her office in Iowa, from there she opened another office in Chicago. Her dental career was considered extremely successful.

If you are considering dental work or are due for a check up, contact the experts at Samuels
Dental Arts, P.C. Their family owned and operated practice offers sedation dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, implants, dentures, and family dentistry.

Article submitted by Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: Gettysburg dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg, Dental history

Gettysburg dentist discusses history of toothbrush

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Nov 14, 2013 @ 14:11 PM

Gettysburg dentist

 

No one invention in dental history is more appreciated
than the toothbrush. Natural bristle brushes were first introduced by the
ancient Chinese. These early dental inventors first devised the toothbrush using
natural bristles attached to the bones of cold climate pigs. 

French dentists were the first to introduce toothbrushes to European culture
in the seventeenth and early eighteenth century. William Addis of England was
the first individual in history to promote the toothbrush commercially in
Europe, prompting many individuals to rethink their personal dental care. 

After the Civil War, American H.N. Wadsworth began to manufacture and sell
the first mass produced toothbrush. The earliest commercial-style brush was
produced in Massachusetts by the Florence Manufacturing Company. The brush was
called the Pro-phy-lac-tic. Try saying that ten times fast.

Nylon bristle toothbrushes became popular around 1938. The first nylon style
brush was produced by the DuPont Company. According to statistics, the act of
brushing one's teeth did not gain in popularity until WWII, when soldiers got in
the habit of brushing during boot camp.

The first electric toothbrush ever made was designed and developed in
Switzerland in 1939. The Squibb company perfected the electric toothbrush in
1960 and began distribution in America (to dentist offices only) around the same
time, it was called the Broxodent. Electric cordless toothbrushes were not
available to the public in America until 1987 from a company called
Interplak.

Toothpaste has been proven to be in existence as early as 500BC. The earliest
users of toothpaste were the ancient inhabitants of China and India. Modern
style toothpaste was developed in the early 1800s. An American by the name of
John Harris was the first to ever add chalk as an ingredient of toothpaste. Dr.
Washington Sheffield of Connecticut was the first person to introduce toothpaste
in a tube. Colgate adapted Sheffield's design and later added detergents and
flouride to the mix for better tooth maintenance.

Dental history facts are fun, but if you are looking for a modern, hi tech, Gettysburg dentist, look to the future at Samuels Dental Arts P.C.!

 

Article submitted by:  Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: Gettysburg dentist, Dental history

Considering a Sedation Dentist?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Sun, Nov 10, 2013 @ 15:11 PM

 



Sedation dentist in Gettysburg

 

If you are like many Americans, just the word "dentist" can send shivers down your spine. New innovation and technology has made dentistry less invasive and easier to handle than ever before. Choosing a sedation dentist can help you face your fears and finally have that dental work you have been putting off for so long.

Sedation dentistry is no longer reserved for surgeries or complicated procedures. Sedation dentists offer sedation anesthesia for cleanings, fillings, implants, crowns and almost any dental procedure. When deciding which sedation dentist will be best for you, it is important to evaluate the experience and training of the dentist.  Our office uses the services of a medical anesthesiologist.  The level of sedation he can provide is much greater than with just a pill taken before the appointment  

You may be wondering if you can afford sedation dentistry. To be truthful, the cost varies per procedure, per patient. But one of the most attractive benefits of sedation dentistry is that more work can be done in less time. This means more than one procedure can be performed during a single visit. Fewer trips to the dentist can save you money in the long run.  Often years of work can be caught up in one, comfortable visit.  Many patients feel like they were in the chair for just five minutes!  

Anxiety about going to the dentist does not have to be the norm. Choosing the right dentist can work wonders for your appearance and health. When deciding which sedation dentist is right for you, narrow your search by stopping by the dentists office or contacting them via the internet. In most cases, the dentist's staff will be happy to explain their sedation procedures, services they offer, and potential cost.

For more information on sedation dentistry and how it can benefit you, contact us at Samuel's Dental Arts, P.C. Our family run and operated dental office has proudly serves
the residents of Gettysburg, PA and the surrounding areas using cutting-edge technology coupled with the most gentle approach. 


Topics: Gettysburg sedation dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg, Sedation dentist Gettysburg, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

Gettysburg Dentist discusses the Benefits of Cerec Porcelain Onlays

Posted by Peter Samuels on Tue, Nov 5, 2013 @ 14:11 PM

Gettysburg Cerec Dentist

 

There are several techniques and  materials that a Gettysburg dentist may use to
restore teeth. Composite resin is usefull if the cavity isn't too big.  Crowns made of porcelain, metal, or a combination can hold a tooth together when the cavity is very large.  Porcelain onlays made by a Cerec machine, are somewhere in between. Here’s a closer look
at what Cerec onlays are and why this Gettysburg dentist likes to use them.

Although similar, a porcelain Cerec onlay is not a crown. Onlays are designed to
restore a tooth’s biting surface. They are often used by Cerec trained dentists
when a patient’s tooth has a cavity that is too large for a standard filling. A
crown, on the other hand, is designed to cover more surface area. Therefore, it
is often used when an entire tooth has sustained extensive damage.

There are several advantages that may be gained by utilizing porcelain onlays
over other restorative materials. To begin with, Cerec onlays allow for the preservation of
the natural tooth. They also tend to blend in nicely with a person’s existing
teeth. As a matter of fact, Cerec restorations are virtually invisible.

 

Cerec onlays generally take one visit to fabricate.  The tooth is numbed.  The decay is removed and an infrared image of the prepared tooth is uploaded to a computer.  No messy impressions necessary!  The Cerec restoration is designed on the computer and milled by a cad cam robot type machine.  It is then chemically bonded to the tooth.  Unlike with a lab made crown, there is no need for the patient to return for a second visit.

To learn more about porcelain Cerec onlays and speak with a Gettysburg
dentist
, please contact Samuels Dental Arts P.C. Our Gettysburg dentists may be
reached online or by calling (717) 778-4268. We also serve patients in
Chambersburg, Hanover and Harrisburg.

Topics: Gettysburg Cerec Dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg

Are You Are a Good Candidate for Dental Implants?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Tue, Oct 22, 2013 @ 11:10 AM

 


 

 

dental implantsDid you know that even the ancient Egyptians used dental implants? The University of Rochester Medical Center reveals that anthropologists have discovered mummies with implants that date back thousands of years. Of course, since then the technology has vastly improved.

In simplest terms, modern dental implants are made of surgical-grade titanium posts that a dentist places in bone under your gum tissue. This process replaces the roots of previously extracted teeth and allows the material to fuse to the bone. (Osseointegrate) Then, an artificial tooth made of ceramic that mimics the size and color of your existing teeth is fastened to the implant. The result is a permanently mounted artificial tooth that is next to impossible to detect with the naked eye.

You are a good candidate for dental implants if:

  1. You are looking for a lifetime solution to spaces left by missing teeth. If you are in good health and committed to caring for your oral health, there is a good chance that the implants last for your entire life.
  2. You take oral hygiene seriously. Since periodontal disease can develop at the implant site as easily as you may find it around your natural teeth, it is crucial to be vigilant about oral hygiene. If you are willing to get up close and personal with your brush, floss and dental water jet, the implants can be the right solution. If you are further willing to visit your hygienist every three months or so, you are definitely a good candidate.
  3. You want to get out and mingle! It is sometimes difficult to speak clearly when certain teeth are missing. At other times, it can be hard to mount dentures or bridges in a mouth where several teeth are unable to support them. Finally, there is occasionally a marked difficulty in enjoying certain nutritious foods. This may leave you feeling shy and even cause you to withdraw from social activities. When you are ready to get out and mingle but feel that your missing teeth are keeping you from enjoying all that life has to offer, implants may be the answer.

There used to be a time when diabetes sufferers were discouraged from considering implants. This is no longer the case. If you have your diabetes under control, you can be a good candidate for the procedure. Samuels Dental Arts P.C. knows that you probably have a lot of questions about dental implants. Contact us today for more information. Our friendly staff members are looking forward to answering all of your questions.

Topics: Gettysburg dentist, Gettysburg sedation dentist, implant dentist, Gettysburg implant dentist

Gettysburg Dentist Warns Against Gum Disease

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Oct 3, 2013 @ 14:10 PM

gum disease dentist

 

Gum disease, more medically known as periodontal disease, is an
infection that destroys the gums and the bone that supports your teeth. It can
affect one or more teeth, removing bone without you knowing until it's too
late.

The primary cause is plaque, a colorless film that forms all the time around
your teeth. When left untended, plaque can harden into tartar, which can only be
removed by a dental professional. However, many factors can affect gum
disease.

  • Genetics. If you're family has a history of periodontal disease, you're more
    likely to develop it.

  • Bad oral hygiene. Not brushing or flossing after every meal allows tartar to
    accumulate.

  • Tobacco. Smoking not only increases the chances of periodontal disease but
    can affect treatment.

  • Poor nutrition. Without the right food, your body is less able to ward off
    infection.

You won't always experience the symptoms of gum disease, but some of them
include the following.

  • Bleeding while you brush or floss.

  • Tender and swollen gums.

  • Loose or separating teeth.

  • Constant bad breath.

  • Gums receding from the teeth, making them appear longer.

Treatment for gum disease varies according to how far the infection has
progressed. In the early stages, we may simply remove the tartar, and
recommend brushing and flossing to minimize the problem. Later stages may see
significant bone loss, which may require surgery.

The best way to determine if you have periodontal disease is to contact us,
your Gettysburg dentist, so we can
examine your gums and teeth.

Topics: Periodontal Disease, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg

Dental Sleep Appliance Treatment

Posted by Peter Samuels on Mon, Sep 30, 2013 @ 22:09 PM

 

Dental Sleep Appliance

 

 

What is it Oral Appliance Therapy?

Oral Appliance Therapy (OAT), or snore appliance, is a non-surgical method of controlling snoring or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by use of dental appliance. The device, similar to an orthodontic retainer or a mouth-guard used by athletes, is worn in the mouth while sleeping to prevent the soft tissues of the throat from collapsing and obstructing the airway.

Types of OAT

  1. Mandibular Advancement Appliances (MMA): This option advances the jaw forward and helps to open the airway space.
  2. Tongue-Retaining Devices (TRD): This method focuses specifically on the tongue. By simply moving the tongue forward, the airway is opened and easier breathing occurs.
  3. Palatal Lifting Appliances (PLA): By lifting the soft palate, the airway space is opened up, allowing a freer air flow, and reducing OSA and snoring.

Do you need Oral Appliance Therapy?

OAT is the first choice of patients who experience heavy snoring or mild sleep apnea according to the The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). It is also a viable and effective solution for people who experience moderate or severe sleep apnea who are not a good candidate for a CPAP (continuous positive air pressure) machine. Further, OAT can be used in conjunction with CPAP when there are issues with nasal CPAP alone. This done by lowering the pressure, thus making it more tolerable for the patient.

Oral appliances offer a safe, highly-effective and non-invasive treatment option for the millions of Americans suffering from OSA and severe, chronic snoring. If you think you suffer from a sleep-related sleeping disorder, you should seek the help of a qualified sleep medical professional.

Drs. Samuels and Dr. Berger have helped many PA residents who sufferer from sleep-related problems like snoring and sleep apnea. If you have any questions or concerns about a condition that you may have, contact us by calling 717.778.4268, or by email SamuelsDentalArts@Yahoo.com to schedule some time for an evaluation.


Topics: snore appliance, gettysburg sleep dentist, gettysburg sleep apnea, dental snore appliance, Gettysburg sedation dentist

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