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I’d rather have a Root Canal than…(fill in blank!) Root canal Treatment in Gettysburg

Posted by Peter Samuels on Mon, Dec 18, 2017 @ 19:12 PM

 

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The dental procedure known as a root canal is often employed to save a natural tooth. Dentists commonly perform this operation as part of their general resume. Endodontists and oral surgeons are specialists who can provide root canal treatments as well. In general, root canal treatment means the removal of the pulp tissue from within a tooth and its replacements with a material to seal the hollowed our root system. Root canals become necessary in a variety of situations. Here are some reasons why your dentist could decide this procedure is the best option in your case.

  • Tooth decay can wreak havoc on a tooth. Infections due to bacteria can eat away at the enamel and delve farther if left unchecked. While early intervention with a bonded filling or a crown can often prevent the need for invasive treatment, many times an infection damages and weakens the tooth to the point that a root canal is necessary. This generally occurs when the pulp (the inner portion of the tooth) becomes inflamed or dies. If left untreated infection can form around the root. Eventually the infection can spread to the face and cause swelling and even life threatening systemic infection. A root canal can usually effectively clear the infection and save the tooth.
  • Trauma can lead to the need for a root canal. This happens when forceful impact occurs to a tooth. A blow to the mouth, a bad fall, a car accident can cause trauma to the tooth and the pulp tissue. Sometimes, even many years after the trauma, the pulp can die and become infected. Root canal treatment to remove the infected pulp can save the tooth.
  • A deep filling due to deep decay often will cause a tooth to be temperature sensitive. This is normal. Occasionally, even years later, the pulp will become inflamed or infected and require root canal treatment.

Modern root canal treatment is usually comfortable and painless. Dental IV sedation anesthesia is available for apprehensive patients.  Contrary to popular belief root canals do not cause pain, they relieve pain!

Peter J. Samuels, DDS is clinical instructor at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry and a local Gettysburg dentist.

717-334-0555 GettysburgFamilyDentist.com

Topics: Absessed tooth, Root Canal Treatment, Sedation dentist Gettysburg

Ask Your Gettysburg Dentist about Abscessed Teeth

Posted by Peter Samuels on Sun, Apr 24, 2016 @ 15:04 PM

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There are a number of causes of toothache, including decay, injury, sinus problems, and even clenching or grinding. An abscessed tooth-- which is an infection that occurs in the pulp of the tooth and can then spread to the bone and tissues surrounding the tooth root, can be a serious dental emergency that needs prompt treatment.

Symptoms

Could you possibly have an abscessed tooth? Only your dentist can tell you for sure, but consider the following symptoms:

  • Tooth pain If you have persistent, severe pain that wakes you up at night an abscessed tooth might be the cause.
  • Fever. An abscessed tooth is an infection, so the body may respond with a fever.
  • Swollen gums. Periodontal disease is the most common cause of gum discomfort. An abscessed tooth, however, can also cause swollen, red, and tender gums. Sometimes, an open, draining sore on the gums will also be present.
  • Foul-smelling breath. While there are many causes of halitosis, persistent, foul-smelling breath can be indicative of an abscessed tooth. Likewise, a bitter taste in the mouth should prompt further investigation.
  • No Symptoms. Surprisingly, many abscessed teeth do not hurt at all.  Pain from an abscessed tooth is caused by pressure building up in the bone. If the infection finds a place to drain or dissipate, there may be no pain.  Signs of an abscess can show up on a routine dental x-ray, usually as a dark shadow above the root tip.

Prevention

The main culprit behind an abscessed tooth is severe tooth decay. Your best line of defense against developing an abscessed tooth is good oral hygiene, including:

  • Regular brushing. You should brush your teeth at least twice a day, and more often if you've been indulging in sugary snacks or carb-loaded food.
  • Flossing. Brushing alone is not enough. Flossing is an important part of good oral hygiene; floss can reach the areas between the teeth where food particles and bacterial plaque get trapped.
  • Preventive care. Visiting your dentist for check-ups, professional cleanings and fluoride treatments is a vital part of maintaining a healthy smile. It’s the only way to catch cavities when they are small before the decay gets close to the pulp and can cause a dental abscess. 

 

Peter J. Samuels is a local Gettysburg dentist and a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry.

717-334-0555   GettysburgFamilyDentist.com

Topics: Dentist Gettysburg, Absessed tooth

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