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Gettysburg Dentist Tips for Curbing Easter Candy Cravings

Posted by Peter Samuels on Tue, Mar 24, 2015 @ 11:03 AM

Cosmetic Dentist Peter J. Samuels, DDS

 

In just a few short weeks, many Americans will be presenting their loved ones with Easter candies. Before that happens, our cosmetic dentistry team in Gettysburg wanted to briefly discuss the sweet tooth myth and offer alternatives to the classic, holiday confections. Let’s start with a few studies that help show why dental patients shouldn’t be blaming their teeth for their sugar cravings:

In June 2013, an article appeared in a research journal published by The Obesity Society. It revealed that by and large, humans really do eat with their eyes. In other words, the mere sight of Easter treats can cause feel-good, chemical changes to occur in our bodies, which eventually lead towards the development of cravings. It wasn’t the first study to indicate as much. Over the years, several have appeared in the journals, Neuroscience and Cell alone. So clearly, the best way to overcome those Easter candy cravings is to change how we look at sweets and retrain our brains.

Our cosmetic dentistry team suggests patients start by taking a look at candy substitutes that can fool the brain. For instance, there are products on the market today that look like sugary candies but are actually made with xylitol. We’ve talked about xylitol in previous blog posts. It’s a substance that is known to help minimize or get rid of cavity causing bacteria. That’s why people often include it in oral hygiene products like mouthwashes, chewing gums, breath mints, dental floss and toothpaste. Some of the companies that produce edibles made with xylitol are Dr. John’s Candies™, Xlear Incorporated, Simply Xylitol® and Xyla™.

Xylitol is not the only product that can be used to trick our brains into thinking a sweet, Easter treat is near. There are many natural ingredients that can add sweetness to what we eat and drink without increasing their sugar levels. The list of ingredients that may work includes, but isn’t limited to pure vanilla bean powder, ground cinnamon, almonds, coconuts, apples, beets, avocados and grated carrots. To learn more about protecting loved ones’ teeth without forgoing all the holiday fun, please contact us today.

 

Peter J. Samuels, DDS is a local Gettysburg dentist and a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School.

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry

Are Dental Veneers and Implants Tax Deductible?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Mon, Mar 9, 2015 @ 11:03 AM

Gettysburg Dentist Peter Samuels. DDS

 

It’s almost time for Americans to sit down and calculate their taxes for the year. We sometimes get patients that contact the office and ask, “Are porcelain crowns, veneers, or dental implants and other dental expenses tax-deductible?” It’s a good question to ask and the IRS has published an entire pamphlet to address that question and more for people who will be filing during the 2014 tax period.   For those that don’t want to read the booklet at this time, the short answer is some dental expenses are tax-deductible and others are not.

The major difference between the two categories is medical necessity. In other words, if a patient experienced a health problem in 2014 that negatively affected his or her teeth, chances are at least some of the treatment costs will be tax-deductible. It may also be possible to deduct other costs, like  medications and health insurance premiums associated with routine or emergency dental procedures. The list of medically necessary examples that the IRS casually refers to in the pamphlet includes, but is not limited to dentures, dental x-rays, fluoride treatments, invisible braces and tooth-colored filings.

The agency also makes it a point to note that purely cosmetic procedures and personal use items are not tax-deductible. So, that means it’s not possible to deduct the cost of in-home or in-office teeth whitening. Expenses related to OTC toothpaste, dental floss, mouthwash and general care products are typically not considered tax-deductible either.

This brings us back to the question, “Are porcelain crowns, dental implants and fillings medically necessary?” If they were performed to repair damaged teeth and restore oral health, the answer is most likely “yes.” The best way to know for sure is to read the pamphlet and discuss any outstanding issues with your trusted tax preparer or an IRS agent.

Peter J. Samuels, DDS is a local Gettysburg dentist and a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School.

717-334-0555 GettysburgFamilyDentist.com

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, Veneers, Tax deductions

Should Cosmetic Dentistry be part of your Wedding Plans?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Wed, Feb 25, 2015 @ 11:02 AM

 

 Cosmetic Dentistry

You’ve gotten engaged over the last few weeks and now it’s time to think about the future. So you wonder, “Should cosmetic dentistry be a part of our wedding plans?”  It’s a decision that should be made carefully. The good news is a visit to a dentist who provides cosmetic treatments may help steer you in the right direction. Your dentist and hygienist can clean your teeth and check for oral health problems that may interfere with you saying your “I dos.”  A cosmetic oriented dentist can examine your teeth and smile with an eye towards creating a great smile for the wedding day and beyond.  

What are some options?  Maybe you just need a little whitening either in the office with a power whitening system, or with custom made, take home whitening trays. If you have old, stained fillings in front teeth, they can be replaced with newer, modern bonded materials that blend in with your natural teeth.  Uneven, dark teeth can be bonded with veneers to give almost anyone the smile of their dreams.  Want them straighter?  Consider Invisalign.  Need a little lip plumping?  Juviderm may the answer.

Your initial visit will usually involve a thorough dental exam of your teeth and gums as well as any necessary digital x-rays to see bone levels.  Photographs are taken and sometimes molds will be made to evaluate your bite.  If veneers are an option then a wax-up of you final smile is made so you can see the result before anything is done to your teeth.

We have so many great options today for improving your smile.  But don’t wait till the last minute!  Getting a nice result can take some planning and time.

Peter J. Samuels, DDS is a local Gettysburg dentist and a clinical instructor at at University of Maryland Dental School.

717-334-0555      GettysburgCosmeticDental.com

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, Gettysburg cosmetic dentist

Which Cosmetic Dentistry Option will Improve Your Smile?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Mon, May 5, 2014 @ 17:05 PM

 


gettysburg cosmetic dentistry


 

Would you be less self conscious about smiling if your teeth were a little whiter or straighter? Do you hide your smile because you have chipped or worn teeth?  Do you have missing teeth that affect your ability to chew and speak?  If you answered yes to any of these questions you should consider cosmetic dentistry!  Increase your confidence and improve your self-esteem with your new stunning smile!

Determining which cosmetic dentistry option is right for you depends on what you are trying to correct.  The summaries below should help guide you in the right direction.  

Invisalign to Straighten Teeth

With the revolutionary Invisalign system clear plastic aligners are used to straighten your teeth.  Multiple sets of aligners are used in sequence to achieve ideal correction.  Aligners are typically changed every 2 weeks allowing your teeth to become straighter step by step.  Invisalign patients enjoy that their teeth are being straightened without the use of obvious braces.  The aligners can be removed allowing you to eat and brush like normal.  Patients also describe Invisalign as comfortable to wear with fantastic results! 

Teeth Whitening

If the color of your teeth prevents you from feeling good about your smile then you should consider an in-office power whitening system.  This bleaching process takes about an hour and will lighten darkened  enamel.  The improvement is often several shades and you will be able to maintain that improvement by following simple post-whitening care instructions. Patients feel younger and are pleasantly surprised at how quick and pain-free this cosmetic dentistry method is.

Veneers

Lumineers or Porcelian Veneers are used to correct minor flaws such as chipped or worn teeth. In addition veneers can close spaces, increase length, improve whiteness and even straighten teeth.  Veneers are durable and can be placed  painlessly in as short as 2 visits.   

Dental Implants or Dentures 

If you have a missing tooth or multiple missing teeth dental implants or a full set of dentures may be the best option for you.  Dental implants provide excellent support and stability by creating artificial roots in your jaw bone.  The teeth attached to the implant are durable and look natural.  Dentures are custom-made for you, easy to maintain and can restore the look of your smile.  Both dentures and dental implants will help you restore chewing and speech and allow you to smile confidently. 

To find out if cosmetic dentistry is right for you schedule your consultation and start on the path to a new smile that will change your life!  If you have a fear of dental procedures consider sedation dentistry  which can allow us to fix years of problems often in one, comfortable, relaxing
visit. 

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, Gettysburg cosmetic dentist

Gettysburg Dentist Discusses the History of Toothpaste

Posted by Peter Samuels on Wed, Feb 26, 2014 @ 17:02 PM

 

Gettysburg Dentist


 

Way before there were dentists or dental hygienists, people found a need to keep their teeth clean. Dental hygiene may have been crude, but not without some degree of ingenuity. As always, the focus on preventive dental hygiene remains paramount. The history of toothpaste revealed some interesting developments as mankind searched for the ultimate toothpaste to banish stain, toothaches and bad breath.

The oldest record of toothpaste was found written on a piece of dusty papyrus in a Viennese museum, dating as  far back as 300-500 B.C. An ancient Egyptian scribe recorded the formula for a “powder for white and perfect teeth.” The list of ingredients included rock salt, mint, dried iris flower and pepper, all crushed together for that magic effect. Other accounts detailed the use of less savory ingredients such as oxen hooves, egg shells, pumice and myrrh (thrown in to offset the smell, for sure).

Separate records dating back to more than 6,000 years ago reveal interesting development in the quest for better oral health in various cultures. In China, they utilized an assortment of twigs and bones, mashed and then mixed with water, salt and flower petals to form a thick paste. They used the sharp edge of bamboo leaf to apply paste to the teeth.

In India, they drew upon their strong Ayurvedic background and came out with a clever way of sprucing up their dental health—they used special twigs filled with sweet nectar. They figured that by chewing on these “tasty” twigs, the abrasive nature of the twigs would clean the teeth and dislodge any unwelcome food particles.

In Greece and Rome, they also found the need for abrasive ingredients, using crushed bones and oyster shells. They also used various flavorings to freshen up breath such as charcoal and bark.

As ingenious as these powders and pastes were, they remained crude and the abrasive ingredients may not be very friendly to tooth enamel and gums. In the 1800’s, soap was used to try to mitigate some of the abrasive nature of these pastes.  An actual paste sold in jar became commercially available and, in 1873, Colgate decided to mass produce the toothpaste, as we know today.

Over the years, with research and experimentation, toothpaste has become less abrasive. More synthetic ingredients were added such as sodium lauryl sulfate as a foaming agent and sweeteners to make tooth brushing a more pleasant experience. The 1950’s and 1960’s saw the addition of fluoride for better dental health and from then on, toothpaste took on more sophistication with the use of additives such as gels and whitening agents. Toothpaste for sensitive teeth, toothpaste to whiten and brighten teeth, and toothpaste to strengthen enamel, the choices are as varied as the needs of the populace.

Toothpaste will continue to evolve, with more emphasis on preventing dental decline. To keep your dental health in optimal condition, it is important to get regular checkups and professional cleaning. Contact us today for all your dental needs. 

 

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, dentist, Dental Hygiene, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

New Technology for the New Year at Samuels Dental Arts P.C.

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Jan 2, 2014 @ 14:01 PM

technology pic

 


 

Dr. Peter Samuels, Dr. Julie Berger and the staff of Samuels Dental Arts P.C. want to wish you a Happy New Year and hope to see you in 2014. We welcome new patients and our goal is to serve your entire family. Come and give us a visit and see how our investment in new technology in dentistry can help you.

Our Gettysburg dental practice has invested in training and equipment to provide you with the latest in the dentistry. We have more options in your dental care that includes a CAD/CAM which allows for faster delivery options. We know that your time is valuable, ask about our CEREC same day crowns.

 

Dr. Samuels, earned his D.D.S. from Georgetown University School of Dentistry and, as a local Gettysburg dentist, has been active in his continuing education. He has attended the following programs among many many others: 

  • The Misch Implant Institute at the University of Pittsburg
  • The Pankey Institute of Graduate Dentistry
  • NYU's Rosenthal Cosmetic Dentistry course

Besides his full time Gettysburg dentl practice, he is currently a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School.

He maintains active memberships in:

  • American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry
  • Academy of General Dentistry (Fellowship status)
  • American Dental Association
  • American Dental Society of Anesthesiology

See our facebook page for his aikijuzu martial arts technique!

Dr. Julie Berger, DDS, as a board certified Prosthodontist trained for three additional years after dental school. She then attended a 1 year, full time fellowship in periodontal prosthodontics and in dental implant placement. She is an expert in dentures, crowns & bridges, implants and esthetics. She received her training from the University of Maryland and is a clinical instructor there.

She maintains memberships in:

  • American Board of Prosthdontics
  • Fellow of the American College of Prosthodontists
  • American Dental Association
  • Academy of General Dentistry
  • Pennsylvania Dental Association
  • Gettysburg Hanover Dental Society

So what's the latest in dentistry you might ask? Well, for starters we can make crowns quicker. In some cases we can have them done in one visit. Our porcelain onlays are a popular choice over silver amalgm fillings.

For cosmetic needs we have all ceramic crowns, veneers, and in office, power Teeth whitening.  We offer sedation dentistry with a board certified anesthesiologist. You and your family are in great hands with Dr. Samuels and Dr. Berger.

All phases of dentistry are offered including:

  • Veneers
  • All Ceramic Crowns
  • Porcelain and Gold Crowns
  • Implants
  • Teeth Whitening
  • Full mouth reconstruction
  • Dentures
  • Cerec one day crowns 
  • Sedation dentistry
  • Invisalign 

Our new, modern office has been designed for your comfort. Come by and pay us a visit. We love to give tours and hope to see more of you! We are located at 1650 Biglerville Road, Gettysberg, Pennsylvania 17325 (717)778-4268.

See our website for additional information. 

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, Cerec dentist, Gettysburg dental implants, Gettysburg implant dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg dentist

Here are a few more Interesting Tidbits about Dental History!

Posted by Peter Samuels on Fri, Dec 27, 2013 @ 11:12 AM

 

Gettysburg Dentist history facts

 

There is evidence of dentistry being practiced as far back as 7000 BC; at that time, bow drills were used in the treatment of tooth decay. In ancient Greece tooth extraction was a common procedure used to treat a variety of different illnesses, and the professionals who treated dental problems were not doctors but barbers. It wasn’t until the years between 1650 and 1800 when modern dentistry got its start.

The history of dentistry is filled with odd and sometimes humorous happenings. Here are some of the most interesting facts about dentistry:

Contrary to popular belief, President George Washington’s false teeth were not constructed of wood; his teeth were actually made from a combination of elephant tusks, human, cow and walrus teeth and gold.

Experts recommend that you store your toothbrush at least six feet away from your toilet. Why? When you flush, fecal particles travel through the air and can land on a tooth brush up to six feet away. Using a toothbrush cap is not the best solution to this problem: the moist environment maintained by a toothbrush cover allows more bacteria to grow and multiply.

A snail’s mouth is the size of the head of a pin and contains about 25,000 teeth.

Tooth decay is the second most prevalent illness in the United States behind the common cold.

Each person’s teeth are as unique as their fingerprints; even identical twins have a different dental “fingerprint”. Paul Revere is the first person known to have used dental forensics to identify a body.

In 2012, the average amount left by the tooth fairy was $2 per tooth.

The average man in the United States smiles 8 times a day; the average woman smiles 62 times per day.

Giraffes only have bottom teeth. 

These are just a few of the many interesting facts about dentistry. Here’s one final fact that produced several humorous headlines in 1994: A prisoner in Charleston, West Virginia escaped by braiding dental floss into a rope about the thickness of a telephone cord. He then used the rope to scale an 18 foot wall in the recreation yard and made his escape.

 

Submitted by Peter Samuels, DDS

Topics: Dental history, Cosmetic Dentistry, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

Gettysburg Cosmetic Dentist discusses options for Cosmetic Dentistry

Posted by Peter Samuels on Sat, Sep 14, 2013 @ 15:09 PM

Cosmetic dentistry in Gettysburg

 

You may be under the impression that all cosmetic dentistry involves
time-consuming, expensive, and painful procedures just so your teeth can look
good. In fact, several options are available at different price and convenience
levels.

Teeth whitening treats colored or stained teeth so they
become whiter. This is the least intrusive option and can be done at home with
kits you can buy over the counter. In-office dental whitening and professional, custom, take home whitening using custom, fabricated teeth bleaching trays is far more
effective because it can use stronger agents while protecting sensitive areas of
the mouth, such as the gums.

Fillings are arguably the most familiar of the cosmetic
methods because many individuals have had cavities filled as a protective measure
when they were still schoolchildren. Fillings can also repair rough spots and
chips with resins or porcelain materials that can be colored to look like
natural teeth. They bond directly to the enamel and dentin, adding further
protection.  Modern, cosmetically oriented dentists have the ability to artistically bond composite fillings to front or back teeth making the fillings almost invisible.

Crowns cover broken, cracked or decayed teeth to prevent further
damage in the future which can involve extensive procedures, time,
and expense. In the past, such crowns were made out of gold for better
durability at the expense of aesthetics. Modern crowns can often be pure ceramic.
 They provide strength and durability, and are indistinguishable from
natural teeth even when used in the front of the mouth. 

Veneers are a thin layer of porcelain artistically designed and custom made for your individual teeth.  They can be bonded to the outside surface of front teeth to produce the gorgeous, white smile you have always wanted.

Rather than trying to decide on your own which of these options is preferable
for your appearance, why not contact us for an appointment? We can thoroughly
diagnose your problem and recommend options that are not only effective but also
fit your time and budget constraints.  As unrestricted dental providers, Dr. Samuels and Dr. Berger are able to provide the right dental solution using the most cosmetic dental materials available without worrying about the restrictions of your dental insurance companies.

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg Emergency Dentist discusses treatments

Posted by Peter Samuels on Tue, Feb 26, 2013 @ 19:02 PM

 

 

Gettysburg Emergency Dentist

 

What is a dental emergency?

Well that could be different things for different people!  When we watch glamerous TV emergency medicine shows we think of life threatening , every second  is critical, heroic action.  Nurses and physicians rush to gather data and make a diagnosis.  Specialists are consulted.  Bleeding is stopped.  Hearts are restarted.  Patients are stabilized. 

“I have a cosmetic dentistry emergency!”

A broken tooth, right in the front, would constitute an emergency for most of us.  A fractured veneer or porcelain crown would keep most of us from facing the public or going to work.  Quick work with composite bonding usually provides, at least a temporary emergency fix.  The tooth is etched with a mild acidic solution, a bonding agent is applied, and plastic resin can artfully be sculpted to replace the broken parts.

“I’ve been up all night with a toothache.”

Pain, unfortunately, is the motivator for many people to visit an emergency dentist.  Now we are dealing with a medical problem as well as a dental one.  As a matter of fact, many toothache problems are treated in the emergency room.  Pain from an infected, abscessed tooth can land you in the hospital and can even be life threatening.  Just as with any other medical problem a diagnosis must be made.  Sometimes it’s simple. “This is the tooth, doc.  It hurts when I bite on it and I’m swollen.”  An x-ray often shows a dark area under the root where the infection has spread to the bone.  Pain comes from a buildup of pressure.  Treatment involves draining and treating the infection, then  root canal treatment or extraction of the tooth to keep the infection from returning.

But not all toothaches are so straight forward.  “It hurts on the left side, Doc.  I can’t tell which one.”  This can be a challenge to figure out.  First of all the emergency dentist needs to put on his medical cap.  Is the pain from a tooth are something completely different?  Did you know that jaw pain can be the first sign of a heart attack?  More commonly, sinus problems can mimic tooth pain. TMD (jaw Joint pain) can also cause jaw and facial pain. If it is from a tooth, which one and why?  Sometimes the offending tooth can be identified by tapping (percussion)  A tooth with an inflamed pulp will often be inflamed in the ligament surrounding the tooth.  Tapping pressure pushes on the inflammation and causes pain.  “That’s’ the one, Doc!” Now we have to have a diagnosis.  Is the pain reversible with a sedative filling?  Is the tooth cracked?  Is it so deeply decayed that root canal treatment is necessary to relieve the pain?

“I bit on a pretzel and broke my tooth.”

Hard pretzels do bring be a lot of business!  Often a cusp will break off on a tooth already weakened by a large filling.  If the filling is old and leaky and bacteria has found a way to get underneath, the tooth structure becomes soft and it doesn’t take much to snap off a cusp.  If the tooth isn’t cracked down the root or broken into the pulp the fix is usually straightforward; a temporary filling for now and a return trip for a porcelain crown to protect the tooth.

“My little girl fell off her bike and knocked out a tooth.”

This one requires quick action.  If it’s a permanent tooth that came out (was avulsed) try to get to the dentist within thirty minutes to have it replaced.  There is a good possibility the tooth will reattach.

Whether it’s a “cosmetic” emergency or a life threatening dental infection, your local emergency dentist is here to help!

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist

Fastbraces – Get Straighter Teeth Faster Then Ever Before!

Posted by Julie Berger on Mon, Jun 25, 2012 @ 16:06 PM

Are you looking for a straighter smile without the hassle and discomfort of traditional braces? Look no further than Fastbraces®!

Fastbraces® used advanced technology to move the tooth crown and the root of the tooth at the same time, yielding a much quicker treatment time than is possible with traditional braces. Now, patients who require braces can get amazing results often with far less sensitivity, generally in about a year, and in some cases, even just a few months.

Learn more about Fastbraces in Gettysburg, PA.

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, General Dentistry, Braces for Teeth, Fastbraces, Orthodontics, Straighter Teeth, Dental Braces

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