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Gettysburg dentist discusses history of toothbrush

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Nov 14, 2013 @ 14:11 PM

Gettysburg dentist

 

No one invention in dental history is more appreciated
than the toothbrush. Natural bristle brushes were first introduced by the
ancient Chinese. These early dental inventors first devised the toothbrush using
natural bristles attached to the bones of cold climate pigs. 

French dentists were the first to introduce toothbrushes to European culture
in the seventeenth and early eighteenth century. William Addis of England was
the first individual in history to promote the toothbrush commercially in
Europe, prompting many individuals to rethink their personal dental care. 

After the Civil War, American H.N. Wadsworth began to manufacture and sell
the first mass produced toothbrush. The earliest commercial-style brush was
produced in Massachusetts by the Florence Manufacturing Company. The brush was
called the Pro-phy-lac-tic. Try saying that ten times fast.

Nylon bristle toothbrushes became popular around 1938. The first nylon style
brush was produced by the DuPont Company. According to statistics, the act of
brushing one's teeth did not gain in popularity until WWII, when soldiers got in
the habit of brushing during boot camp.

The first electric toothbrush ever made was designed and developed in
Switzerland in 1939. The Squibb company perfected the electric toothbrush in
1960 and began distribution in America (to dentist offices only) around the same
time, it was called the Broxodent. Electric cordless toothbrushes were not
available to the public in America until 1987 from a company called
Interplak.

Toothpaste has been proven to be in existence as early as 500BC. The earliest
users of toothpaste were the ancient inhabitants of China and India. Modern
style toothpaste was developed in the early 1800s. An American by the name of
John Harris was the first to ever add chalk as an ingredient of toothpaste. Dr.
Washington Sheffield of Connecticut was the first person to introduce toothpaste
in a tube. Colgate adapted Sheffield's design and later added detergents and
flouride to the mix for better tooth maintenance.

Dental history facts are fun, but if you are looking for a modern, hi tech, Gettysburg dentist, look to the future at Samuels Dental Arts P.C.!

 

Article submitted by:  Peter J. Samuels, DDS

Topics: Dental history, Gettysburg dentist

Considering a Sedation Dentist?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Sun, Nov 10, 2013 @ 15:11 PM

 



Sedation dentist in Gettysburg

 

If you are like many Americans, just the word "dentist" can send shivers down your spine. New innovation and technology has made dentistry less invasive and easier to handle than ever before. Choosing a sedation dentist can help you face your fears and finally have that dental work you have been putting off for so long.

Sedation dentistry is no longer reserved for surgeries or complicated procedures. Sedation dentists offer sedation anesthesia for cleanings, fillings, implants, crowns and almost any dental procedure. When deciding which sedation dentist will be best for you, it is important to evaluate the experience and training of the dentist.  Our office uses the services of a medical anesthesiologist.  The level of sedation he can provide is much greater than with just a pill taken before the appointment  

You may be wondering if you can afford sedation dentistry. To be truthful, the cost varies per procedure, per patient. But one of the most attractive benefits of sedation dentistry is that more work can be done in less time. This means more than one procedure can be performed during a single visit. Fewer trips to the dentist can save you money in the long run.  Often years of work can be caught up in one, comfortable visit.  Many patients feel like they were in the chair for just five minutes!  

Anxiety about going to the dentist does not have to be the norm. Choosing the right dentist can work wonders for your appearance and health. When deciding which sedation dentist is right for you, narrow your search by stopping by the dentists office or contacting them via the internet. In most cases, the dentist's staff will be happy to explain their sedation procedures, services they offer, and potential cost.

For more information on sedation dentistry and how it can benefit you, contact us at Samuel's Dental Arts, P.C. Our family run and operated dental office has proudly serves
the residents of Gettysburg, PA and the surrounding areas using cutting-edge technology coupled with the most gentle approach. 


Topics: Sedation dentist Gettysburg, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist, Dentist Gettysburg

Are You Are a Good Candidate for Dental Implants?

Posted by Peter Samuels on Tue, Oct 22, 2013 @ 11:10 AM

 


 

 

dental implantsDid you know that even the ancient Egyptians used dental implants? The University of Rochester Medical Center reveals that anthropologists have discovered mummies with implants that date back thousands of years. Of course, since then the technology has vastly improved.

In simplest terms, modern dental implants are made of surgical-grade titanium posts that a dentist places in bone under your gum tissue. This process replaces the roots of previously extracted teeth and allows the material to fuse to the bone. (Osseointegrate) Then, an artificial tooth made of ceramic that mimics the size and color of your existing teeth is fastened to the implant. The result is a permanently mounted artificial tooth that is next to impossible to detect with the naked eye.

You are a good candidate for dental implants if:

  1. You are looking for a lifetime solution to spaces left by missing teeth. If you are in good health and committed to caring for your oral health, there is a good chance that the implants last for your entire life.
  2. You take oral hygiene seriously. Since periodontal disease can develop at the implant site as easily as you may find it around your natural teeth, it is crucial to be vigilant about oral hygiene. If you are willing to get up close and personal with your brush, floss and dental water jet, the implants can be the right solution. If you are further willing to visit your hygienist every three months or so, you are definitely a good candidate.
  3. You want to get out and mingle! It is sometimes difficult to speak clearly when certain teeth are missing. At other times, it can be hard to mount dentures or bridges in a mouth where several teeth are unable to support them. Finally, there is occasionally a marked difficulty in enjoying certain nutritious foods. This may leave you feeling shy and even cause you to withdraw from social activities. When you are ready to get out and mingle but feel that your missing teeth are keeping you from enjoying all that life has to offer, implants may be the answer.

There used to be a time when diabetes sufferers were discouraged from considering implants. This is no longer the case. If you have your diabetes under control, you can be a good candidate for the procedure. Samuels Dental Arts P.C. knows that you probably have a lot of questions about dental implants. Contact us today for more information. Our friendly staff members are looking forward to answering all of your questions.

Topics: Gettysburg implant dentist, implant dentist, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg Dentist Warns Against Gum Disease

Posted by Peter Samuels on Thu, Oct 3, 2013 @ 14:10 PM

gum disease dentist

 

Gum disease, more medically known as periodontal disease, is an
infection that destroys the gums and the bone that supports your teeth. It can
affect one or more teeth, removing bone without you knowing until it's too
late.

The primary cause is plaque, a colorless film that forms all the time around
your teeth. When left untended, plaque can harden into tartar, which can only be
removed by a dental professional. However, many factors can affect gum
disease.

  • Genetics. If you're family has a history of periodontal disease, you're more
    likely to develop it.

  • Bad oral hygiene. Not brushing or flossing after every meal allows tartar to
    accumulate.

  • Tobacco. Smoking not only increases the chances of periodontal disease but
    can affect treatment.

  • Poor nutrition. Without the right food, your body is less able to ward off
    infection.

You won't always experience the symptoms of gum disease, but some of them
include the following.

  • Bleeding while you brush or floss.

  • Tender and swollen gums.

  • Loose or separating teeth.

  • Constant bad breath.

  • Gums receding from the teeth, making them appear longer.

Treatment for gum disease varies according to how far the infection has
progressed. In the early stages, we may simply remove the tartar, and
recommend brushing and flossing to minimize the problem. Later stages may see
significant bone loss, which may require surgery.

The best way to determine if you have periodontal disease is to contact us,
your Gettysburg dentist, so we can
examine your gums and teeth.

Topics: Dentist in Gettysburg, Periodontal Disease, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg Implant Dentist discusses Dental Implants

Posted by Peter Samuels on Fri, Sep 20, 2013 @ 22:09 PM

Gettysburg dental implant

 

 

At one time, people faced with tooth loss had very few options. Today, this is no longer the case. Hi tech dentistry has multiple options to choose from including the use of dental implants. Dental implants have become one of the more popular options and with good reason. Implants have a very high success rate and are the closest thing yet to growing back a natural tooth!

Dental implants typically consist of three parts; a cylindrical post, an abutment and a crown. Depending on the type of the implant, one end of the cylindrical post is inserted into the jawbone. Later, the exposed end gets outfitted with an abutment and a crown. Together, they offer patients a variety of benefits.

One of the primary benefits of dental implant tooth replacement is the impact on a person’s bone health. To understand that impact fully, it’s important to first talk about what happens when a tooth is lost.

Soon after a tooth is removed, the supporting, alveolar bone begins to be lost as well. The alveolar bone is an area of the jawbone that surrounds our teeth, sits on top of the basal bone and helps shape our face.

Our alveolar jaw bone structure is kept healthy by the positions of our natural teeth as well as by stimulation from our natural chewing movements. The bottom line is that when natural teeth are lost the health of the bone and the surrounding tissue starts to deteriorate. Jaw bone thins and the shape of the person’s face may change creating additional problems.

Dental implants can stop jaw bone deterioration from occurring because they take the place of the natural teeth below the gum line. Other dental devices, like bridges and dentures, do not go below the gum line and therefore they are not capable of preventing bone deterioration.

In addition, because dental implants closely resemble natural teeth, you can eat, drink and speak normally with the implants in place. The same cannot be said of dentures which have a tendency to move around during normal use. When dentures move around, they often cause the wearer physical discomfort and speech difficulties.

Another way to replace a missing tooth is with a fixed bridge.  If an implant is possible, it offers a significant advantage over bridgework in that healthy teeth do not need to be used as anchors.  With dental implants, the jawbone serves as the anchor. When using dental implants the remaining remaining healthy, natural teeth do not sustain unnecessary damage.

Unlike the alternatives of dentures or fixed bridgework, dental implants are long lasting and extremely durable. They  don’t require nightly removal, the use of messy adhesives or soaking solutions. As such, they are easy to maintain and less likely to become lost or damaged.

Whether you are in need of the replacement of one tooth or all your teeth, dental implants can offer a wonderful solution.  The place to start is to have a discussion with an experienced implant dentist or prosthodontist who has the expertise in dental implantology to explain all your options.

Topics: Gettysburg dental implants, Hanover dental implants, implant dentist, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg Cosmetic Dentist discusses options for Cosmetic Dentistry

Posted by Peter Samuels on Sat, Sep 14, 2013 @ 15:09 PM

Cosmetic dentistry in Gettysburg

 

You may be under the impression that all cosmetic dentistry involves
time-consuming, expensive, and painful procedures just so your teeth can look
good. In fact, several options are available at different price and convenience
levels.

Teeth whitening treats colored or stained teeth so they
become whiter. This is the least intrusive option and can be done at home with
kits you can buy over the counter. In-office dental whitening and professional, custom, take home whitening using custom, fabricated teeth bleaching trays is far more
effective because it can use stronger agents while protecting sensitive areas of
the mouth, such as the gums.

Fillings are arguably the most familiar of the cosmetic
methods because many individuals have had cavities filled as a protective measure
when they were still schoolchildren. Fillings can also repair rough spots and
chips with resins or porcelain materials that can be colored to look like
natural teeth. They bond directly to the enamel and dentin, adding further
protection.  Modern, cosmetically oriented dentists have the ability to artistically bond composite fillings to front or back teeth making the fillings almost invisible.

Crowns cover broken, cracked or decayed teeth to prevent further
damage in the future which can involve extensive procedures, time,
and expense. In the past, such crowns were made out of gold for better
durability at the expense of aesthetics. Modern crowns can often be pure ceramic.
 They provide strength and durability, and are indistinguishable from
natural teeth even when used in the front of the mouth. 

Veneers are a thin layer of porcelain artistically designed and custom made for your individual teeth.  They can be bonded to the outside surface of front teeth to produce the gorgeous, white smile you have always wanted.

Rather than trying to decide on your own which of these options is preferable
for your appearance, why not contact us for an appointment? We can thoroughly
diagnose your problem and recommend options that are not only effective but also
fit your time and budget constraints.  As unrestricted dental providers, Dr. Samuels and Dr. Berger are able to provide the right dental solution using the most cosmetic dental materials available without worrying about the restrictions of your dental insurance companies.

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, dentist, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg Dentist Explains How to Brush Your Teeth

Posted by Peter Samuels on Wed, Aug 14, 2013 @ 08:08 AM

brush resized 600

 

Brushing your teeth is something everybody can do, but unless you learned from
parents who were professional dentists, you may not be doing it in the most
effective way! Try these tips to make a difference.

  1. Divide the mouth into four quadrants starting with the top left as quadrant
    one, the top right as two, the bottom right as three, and the bottom left as
    four.
  2. Start brushing from the last tooth in the back of quadrant one, if you’re
    right handed. (Reverse sides if you’re left handed, so you’re starting from the
    back of two.)
  3. Don’t brush from side to side. Instead, use a circular motion on each tooth
    that includes the gums so you remove any particles trapped between the gum and
    the tooth. Be sure to get the front, back, and top surfaces of each tooth.
  4. Move the brush forward, repeating the movement on each tooth.
  5. Continue from front to back on quadrant two, from back to front on quadrant
    three, and from front to back in quadrant four. Spend at least 30 seconds on
    each quadrant.
  6. Brush the tongue and the inside of the cheeks. The bacteria that builds up
    in these locations can cause bad breath.
  7. Rinse your mouth and toothbrush.
  8. Repeat this pattern with every brushing until it becomes a habit.
  9. Brush at least twice a day, preferably first thing in the morning, to
    eliminate any plaque buildup while you sleep, and before you retire to remove
    debris built up from meals. If possible, brush after every meal.

If you want more dental tips, or want to have your teeth checked, please
contact us, your Gettysburg dentist.

Topics: dentist, tooth brushing, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg Emergency Dentist discusses treatments

Posted by Peter Samuels on Tue, Feb 26, 2013 @ 19:02 PM

 

 

Gettysburg Emergency Dentist

 

What is a dental emergency?

Well that could be different things for different people!  When we watch glamerous TV emergency medicine shows we think of life threatening , every second  is critical, heroic action.  Nurses and physicians rush to gather data and make a diagnosis.  Specialists are consulted.  Bleeding is stopped.  Hearts are restarted.  Patients are stabilized. 

“I have a cosmetic dentistry emergency!”

A broken tooth, right in the front, would constitute an emergency for most of us.  A fractured veneer or porcelain crown would keep most of us from facing the public or going to work.  Quick work with composite bonding usually provides, at least a temporary emergency fix.  The tooth is etched with a mild acidic solution, a bonding agent is applied, and plastic resin can artfully be sculpted to replace the broken parts.

“I’ve been up all night with a toothache.”

Pain, unfortunately, is the motivator for many people to visit an emergency dentist.  Now we are dealing with a medical problem as well as a dental one.  As a matter of fact, many toothache problems are treated in the emergency room.  Pain from an infected, abscessed tooth can land you in the hospital and can even be life threatening.  Just as with any other medical problem a diagnosis must be made.  Sometimes it’s simple. “This is the tooth, doc.  It hurts when I bite on it and I’m swollen.”  An x-ray often shows a dark area under the root where the infection has spread to the bone.  Pain comes from a buildup of pressure.  Treatment involves draining and treating the infection, then  root canal treatment or extraction of the tooth to keep the infection from returning.

But not all toothaches are so straight forward.  “It hurts on the left side, Doc.  I can’t tell which one.”  This can be a challenge to figure out.  First of all the emergency dentist needs to put on his medical cap.  Is the pain from a tooth are something completely different?  Did you know that jaw pain can be the first sign of a heart attack?  More commonly, sinus problems can mimic tooth pain. TMD (jaw Joint pain) can also cause jaw and facial pain. If it is from a tooth, which one and why?  Sometimes the offending tooth can be identified by tapping (percussion)  A tooth with an inflamed pulp will often be inflamed in the ligament surrounding the tooth.  Tapping pressure pushes on the inflammation and causes pain.  “That’s’ the one, Doc!” Now we have to have a diagnosis.  Is the pain reversible with a sedative filling?  Is the tooth cracked?  Is it so deeply decayed that root canal treatment is necessary to relieve the pain?

“I bit on a pretzel and broke my tooth.”

Hard pretzels do bring be a lot of business!  Often a cusp will break off on a tooth already weakened by a large filling.  If the filling is old and leaky and bacteria has found a way to get underneath, the tooth structure becomes soft and it doesn’t take much to snap off a cusp.  If the tooth isn’t cracked down the root or broken into the pulp the fix is usually straightforward; a temporary filling for now and a return trip for a porcelain crown to protect the tooth.

“My little girl fell off her bike and knocked out a tooth.”

This one requires quick action.  If it’s a permanent tooth that came out (was avulsed) try to get to the dentist within thirty minutes to have it replaced.  There is a good possibility the tooth will reattach.

Whether it’s a “cosmetic” emergency or a life threatening dental infection, your local emergency dentist is here to help!

Topics: Cosmetic Dentistry, Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist

Gettysburg dentist reflects on teaching

Posted by Peter Samuels on Mon, Feb 18, 2013 @ 10:02 AM

Gettysburg Dentist Peter J. Samuels, DDS

 

Friday is my favorite day.  Not that the other days of the week are bad.  I really do still enjoy my family dental practice, but, for the last few years now, I’ve looked especially forward to Fridays.  There is something neat about handing down almost three decades of experience as a dentist in Gettysburg, PA to a new generation of eager minds.  For three years now I have forced myself, against my groggy will, to rise at the crack of dawn and suffer the unpredictable two hours of traffic to the University of Maryland Dental School in Downtown Baltimore. 

The dental school is a huge, modern complex rising eight floors from its inner city block and standing proudly across from the medical school across the street.  While I never went to the University of Maryland, (I’m a Georgetown graduate), I am proud to call this dental school my adopted alma mater.

As I enter the third floor of the building my charges await me.  The huge, ultramodern clinic floor is broken into sections by specialty: one area endodontics, or root canal treatment;  one area periodontics; treatment of gum disease.  One area is devoted to children’s dentistry. My section is for general dental practice; dental fillings, dental crowns, dental implants, cosmetic dentistry,  etc.;   the bread and butter of my Gettysburg dental practice.  Six to eight third and fourth year dental students line up to present their cases.  These are very bright, but totally inexperienced, dental students eager to sap my mind for the experience and dental wisdom they crave.  For the tens of thousands of dental procedures I have performed and could now do in my sleep , they have done, at most, ten!  For the thousands of patients, each with their own unique personalities, medical histories, and nerve anatomies, that I have come across in daily practice as a Gettysburg dentist, they have seen but a handful. 

One by one the students present their cases.  Medical histories can be involved and complicated.  Is it safe for this patient to undergo routine dental treatment?  Has a medical consult been ordered? Which local anesthetic is indicated and why?  What do the x-rays tell us?  What are the indications and contraindications for the proposed treatment plan? What are the choices of materials to be used? 

Once the pre-op discussions are complete it's time to begin.  Sometimes shaky, novice, student hands need my guidance and a little encouragement.  How well I remember the first time I ever injected a patient with local anesthetic!  Over the years I’ve learned how to give a virtually painless injection and I mentor the students in the technique.  I teach them all I can about conservative, modern dental treatment.  I stress the importance of treating the whole patient, not just the tooth.

Three hours later the morning clinic session is over.  With prodding, encouragement, and often a little hands on help the procedures are completed and signed off.  The appreciation of my students for my help more that makes up for the two hour city traffic retreat back to Gettysburg.   I thoroughly enjoy my “day job” as a family and cosmetic dentist in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania,  but I have to say teaching family dentistry one day a week refreshes the spirit and is good for the soul!

Topics: Dentist in Gettysburg, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gettysburg dentist

A day in the life of a Gettysburg Dentist

Posted by Peter Samuels on Mon, Feb 4, 2013 @ 16:02 PM

Gettysburg family and sedation dentist, Peter J. Samuels, DDS 

 

 

What is it like to be a dentist in Gettysburg?  What is the typical day of a Gettysburg dentist?  Well, here's what this family dentist did today.

The day began with Maia.  Maia’s blue eyes welled with tears.  The dental chair dwarfed her tiny, seven year old body.  She clung to my assistant’s hand as she looked over all the strange “tooth ticklers” and squirmed nervously.  “My big brother said it’s gonna hurt real bad, but my mommy said it wouldn’t be worse that a bee sting.” 

“Oh my”, I thought.  The family had already set the stage for a bad experience. This was going to take all my children’s dentist chairside skills!  Well, we turned it all around and Maia had a great experience.  Her first cavity was bonded with white, composite filling and she bragged to her mom that she never felt anything at all!  We sealed the permanent molars and spent some time showing Maia how to brush and even floss so she will, hopefully, never have another cavity in her life.

Mrs. Wolfe was already in the next room.  A new patient, she had called first thing this morning in pain, hoping we could work her in.  Her jaw was swollen to the size of a golf ball on the lower right and she looked exhausted from lack of sleep.  A quick, digital x-ray showed the culprit.  An abscessed, lower right molar.  I hate to blog gross, but a quick, small opening in the top of her dead tooth allowed a back pressure of pus to drain and almost instant pain relief followed.  Mrs. Wolfe was a happy camper and so was I.  The ability to immediately relieve pain is one of the most rewarding aspects of life as a Gettysburg dentist.  Time for a course of antibiotics and a trip back in a week or so to go over some long term options.

Beep…beep..beep… the heart monitor called out its rhythm as our anesthesiologist provided his expertise in our dental sedation room.  Sandra was meticulous about her health, but when it came to her teeth,  her bad, childhood, dental  experiences had left their mark.  She hadn’t been to a dentist for 20 years before seeking us out for sedation dentistry.  I remember when she first came in.  A grown woman of 45, she had cried before we even examined her mouth.  She tried to rationalize her fear, but she simply could not.  Sandra lay quietly sedated in la la land as my team and I worked for three hours repairing  years of dental neglect.  She smiled at the end with pretty, new front teeth and whispered, “That felt like I was in the chair for five minutes!”

Lunch, for me, is more of a power nap time that an eat time.  A time to recharge.  I looked over the afternoon’s schedule.  At two I would make a porcelain cap for Carmen’s upper lateral incisor.  Carmen was 62.  She’d broken her tooth in a bicycle accident when she was 11 and it had been down hill since.  After years of patching it had finally given up the ghost and broken off at the gum-line.  Luckily, dental technology had improved since Carmen’s accident.  We had replaced her tooth with a titanium dental implant anchored in the jaw several months ago and today we would make the final, beautiful, all porcelain crown that goes on top.  From three feet away,  no one would be able to tell it wasn’t her real tooth.

Three o’clock , a Cerec , in office, computer  cad cam created porcelain crown and bonded, composite fillings.  Four o’clock, two orthodontic patient checks.  One had Fast Braces on, and it was always fun to see how much her teeth had moved since the last visit.  The other, preferring no visible wires,  was wearling Invisalign aligners.

There is more.  In between  procedures I’ll be checking  the progress of our periodontal therapy patients as they work with the hygiene department.  Periodontal disease is one of the most widespread infectious diseases and the most common reason for tooth loss.  It has been implicated in heart disease, diabetes, and even dementia.  Treating and controlling gum disease is one of the most important jobs of the modern, family dentist and it is important healthcare.

The day in the life of a Gettysburg dentist is sometimes hectic, sometimes stressful, often rewarding, but never boring!  I honestly look forward to tomorrow.

Topics: gettysburg sleep dentist, Gettysburg sedation dentist, Gum Disease, Gettysburg dentist

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